Miscellaneous Projects

NORTH CEDAR PROJECT (CR 64 SHORE IMPACT ZONE STABILIZATION PROJECT)

The North Shore property project addresses an erosion problem that had been ongoing for years with the public using private property as a parking lot, compacting soil and destroying the shore impact zone vegetation needed to filter runoff from Co Rd. 64. Funds left over from the northern shore of the park grant were used to complete this restoration. Treatment consisted of a bioswale and berm 275 feet in length. Native seeding was completed on the berm and over 550 native plants were installed in the bioswale in 2012. Total cost of the project was $6,731 which includes three years of contracted maintenance. An estimated 16.8 lbs of phosphorus will be prevented from entering Cedar Lake. That is significant since one pound of phosphorous can create between 500-1,000 lbs. of algae which means this project is possibly preventing 8,400 16,800 pounds of algae growth.

The landowner was required to install a permanent fence to keep the public from parking on the site. Additionally, No Parking signs were installed by the Scott County Highway Department. Permanent signage showing designated public accesses will be installed.

  

CEDAR LAKE FARM REGIONAL PARK INLET DIVERSION STRUCTURE/WETLAND ENHANCEMENT

The Scott Watershed Management Organization received a grant from the Legislative Citizen Commission on Minnesota Resources Environment and Natural Resources Trust Fund partnered with Scott County Parks, Great River Greening, Scott Soil & Water Conservation District, Department of Natural Resources, and Three Rivers Park District. The project had several goals including habitat improvement, lakeshore buffering for water quality improvement, consistency with the Park Master Plan, and building connections with local communities. Visually enhancing the diversion channel inlet that diverts water from Sand Creek through CD 2 into Cedar Lake was also a goal. This included reshaping the channel and creating a wetland that could be used to educate the public. The grading work was complete in the fall of 2012 with the area being seeded with native species. In addition a volunteer planting event took place in May 2013 to finish the restoration by installing native plugs to get plants established quicker. The project is now in maintenance mode and is open to the public for viewing during posted park hours. Educational signage will be created in 2014.

  

October 2012 - Two current projects underway around Cedar Lake:

  

The first project is a reshaping of the north end of the lake along Cty Rd 64 to restore the area where people have been pulling off the road and parking. The goal here is to improve water quality runoff, stop erosion, and to make the area more like the natural habitat around it. This project is being funded from grant money left over from a BWSR (Board of Water and Soil Resources) grant which helped stabilize 900' of shoreline on the north side of Cedar Lake Farm Park. This project includes planting of a few hundred natural habitat plants, creating a rain garden and adding a cedar split rail fence to protect the area along the roadway. This is private property and the county is working in conjunction with the property owner and the Minnesota Highway Department.

Please note that no funds from the CLID were used for either of these two projects.

 

The project along Cty Rd 2 is a 50-foot extension of the pipe that feeds Cedar Lake from the south which is several hundred yards from the inlet to the lake. This is part of a project to improve the south end of the lake for improving the quality of water that enters into the lake. The project includes digging a small creek with several curves in it from the end of the pipe to the lake. The project also includes adding stepping stones to walk on from around the area. The project is being funded by an LCCMR (Legislative Citizen Committee on Minnesota Resources) grant of $100,000 and a match of $100,000 from the SWMO. The Parks Dept is the lead project manager for the project.

Please note that no funds from the CLID were used for either of these two projects.